Have you noticed that sometimes sequences oriented toward arm balances can be so challenging that by the time you get to the actual fun of the arm balance itself your wrists and shoulders are kind of shot? That’s why I came up with this crow sequence. Check it out: Even though it’s challenging, I guarantee that it won’t waste your wrists and shoulders! Read the full article here.

Tittibhasana, or firefly pose, is an arm balance I’ve been working on for ages, often with very little satisfaction—until recently. But, little by little, my years of study, practice, and cue analysis have finally coalesced into some satisfying progress. One of my favorite personal discoveries (though I’m sure someone else discovered it before I did) is propping the pose at the wall. This version doesn’t make tittibhasana exactly easy, but it does offer enough direction and support so a struggling firefly can take flight with strength and courage. Read the full article here.

Yoga props breathe life into your practice. On occasion as a yoga teacher, I have seen firsthand the resistance to using props in one’s practice. As a student there certainly have been times where I’ve said to myself, “I don’t need to use a block for this pose.” As I move deeper into my practice and as I continue to practice over the years, I find that using props helps keep my yoga practice interesting. If you are unsure whether or not to use props, here are five reasons to incorporate yoga props into your practice and teaching. Read the full article here.

Eka pada koundinyasana II (one-legged Sage Koundinya’s pose II, sometimes known as “flying splits”) is an arm balance that challenges the practitioner’s body and mind at every moment. One way to make this pose more accessible is to use props. Read the full article here.

A key part of being a warrior is challenging yourself in new ways, which can be a lot of fun if you take a playful and exploratory approach. Try these expressions of virabhadrasana ll (warrior ll) using a chair as a prop to see if you can challenge what you know to be true about this asana. You just might gain new insight into some of the subtler dynamics at work in this “everyday” pose and how you work with them. Read the full article here.

Urdhva dhanurasana, or upward bow pose (also known as wheel), is a deep backbend requiring lots of strength and mobility. It also asks your body to move in ways quite different from typical daily movement patterns: lying on the ground on your back, pushing into your hands and feet to lift your body off the floor and into a backbend—and then looking at the world from that inverted vantage point. Read the full article here.

Yoga teachers frequently talk about stretching the hamstrings, and more recently, strengthening them. In stark contrast, the lower leg muscles—and the calves in particular—aren’t addressed nearly as much…. Read the full article here.

When it comes to propping poses, I always ask myself, “Why prop?” The answer is never simple, and it always depends on my objective for practicing or teaching an asana.

With challenging, seemingly inaccessible poses, one answer would be to use props simply to get into them. However, that answer can be incomplete, because I often find props valuable even when I don’t need them to access a pose. Read the full article here.

Use a Chair to Progress Towards a Handstand Press!

 

So, you’ve mastered hopping up into handstand and holding it in the middle of the room. Now you’ve set your sights on pressing up into a handstand. You place your hands on the floor, shift your weight into your hands, your feet lift off the floor, and…you’ve done it.

Wait a minute. Did that actually happen for you? Read the full article here.

Good quality sleep is crucial for good health. With approaching deadlines, important meetings, exams on the horizon, and the regular hustle and bustle of life, sleep can disappear from the scene. Lacking adequate rest, we feel physically sluggish and mentally fatigued. Read the full article here.